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Lesson 171.

SYNTHETIC AND DICTATION EXERCISES.

A’bel, a man’s name.         de scend’ent, falling.
a’ble, powerful.             cough’er, one who coughs.
al’ley, a narrow passage.    coffer, a chest.
al ly’, one who assists.     can’died, covered with sugar.
al lu’sion, a reference.     can’did, honest; truthful.
il lu’sion, mockery.         cent’u ry, 100 years.
de scend’ant, offspring.     sen’try, a guard.

The able man’s name was Abel. A narrow alley. France was an ally of
England in the Crimean war. He made an allusion to the illusion that
possessed him. His descendant was descendent from the same line. The
cougher sat on the coffer. The candid youth ate the candied cakes. The
sentry wore a costume of the last century.

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Able and ible used as suffixes signify that may be, capable of being, fit or worthy to be, or capacity.

eat’a ble    blam’a ble    am’i ca ble
sal’a ble    laugh’a ble   nav’i ga ble
leg’i ble    for’ci ble    com bus’ti ble
cred’i ble   au’di ble     in del’i ble

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Spelling Vocabulary Words – Homophones Beginning With I
 I (see aye)

 I’d (see eyed)

 ide (see eyed)

idyl (-s), idyll (-s), idle (-s), idol (-s)

ileum, ilium

 illicit (see elicit)

 illusive (see allusive)

 I’ll (see aisle)

 immanent, imminent (see eminent)

 immerge (see emerge)

impassable, impassible

impatience, impatiens

in, inn

incidence, incidents

incite, insight (?)

independence, independents

indict (-s), indite (-s)

indigence, indigents

inequity, iniquity (?)

innocence, innocents

instance, instants

 insure (see ensure)

intense, intents

 irrupt (see erupt)

 irruption (see eruption)

 isle (see aisle)

its, it’s

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Teaching Affixes
Lesson 142.

In words like the following, ed is pronounced as t; and, although of two
and three syllables, the words are pronounced in one and two.

graced    fixed   es caped’     at tacked’
scraped   mixed   em braced’    con fessed’
cracked   boxed   en grossed’   op pressed’

In other words formed by the affix ed, the last letter is doubled in words
of one syllable, or in words accented on the last syllable, when they end
with a single consonant preceded by a single vowel; as, wed, wed’ded. If
the word ends in any other consonant than d or t, the e in ed becomes
silent, and the two syllables become one; as, hem, hemmed, pronounced
hemd.

jut’ted    shunned   com pelled   o mit’ted
fret’ted   tapped    e quipped’   im bed’ded
fit’ted    rubbed    de murred’   com mit’ted

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IV

Words which in their shortest form end in _-d_, _-de_, _-ge_, _-unit_,
_-rt_, _-se_, _-sr_, take the ending _-sion_; e.g., _abscind_,
_abscission_; _include_, _inclusion_; _emerge_, _emersion_; _remit_,
_remission_; _infuse_, _infusion_; _repress_, _repression_.

All others take the ending _-tion_.

The following are irregularities:

adhesion
assertion
attention
coercion
cohesion
crucifixion
declension
dimension
dissension
distortion
divulsion
expulsion
impulsion
insertion
intention
occasion
propulsion
recursion
repulsion
revulsion
scansion
suspicion
tension
version

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Affixes – Basic Spelling Rules

Doubling the Final Letter and Exceptions
Lesson 139.

Spelling rule for ing words.

Ing signifies continuing to; as talking, continuing to talk. The following
words, in taking their suffix, double the final letter. The last letter is
doubled when the word ends with a single consonant preceded by a single
vowel.

plan’ning   win’ning    stop’ping   a bet’ting
fret’ting   blot’ting   gun’ning    re bel’ling
bid’ding    rob’bing    shut’ting   o mit’ting

Other words ending with consonants, which do not double the final letter.

act’ing     fail’ing   mean’ing   ex pand’ing
land’ing    rain’ing   coax’ing   con sent’ing
build’ing   sail’ing   suit’ing   vis’it ing

SpellingTeaching SpellingSpelling Rules

Teaching Spelling

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Words in which the Plurals are formed irregularly.

As the Plural only is given, the teacher might require the pupil to ascertain the Singular, and to spell it.

mice           cri’ses     ter’mi ni
chil’dren      neb’u lae   a lum’ni
ver’te brae    stra’ta     syn op’ses   geese
{ kine, cows }
{ staves, staffs}
{ broth’ers,breth’ren }
{ pease, peas}
{ dies, dice}

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